Tag Archives: TPM

New format FETAC / QQI courses from ETAC.

The level 5 “Lean Manufacturing Tools” programme will be run in a new format in 2015.

Introduction
FETAC LogoIn the early 90’s the concept of Lean Manufacturing was introduced by Womack & Jones. The team studied the automotive industry at the time and found dramatic differences in performance and bottom-line profitability particularly between US and Japanese companies. They found best practice results at Toyota in japan.

The Toyota Production System is concerned with maximising value in any process and eliminating waste whilst transforming the value chain, the sequence of events that deliver the client requirements. The tools target improvement in quality, reliability, workplace organisation, and streamlining material and information flows.
This Level 5 programme is designed to give the delegates an overall knowledge of how to use these key tools. As part of the programme, the learner will apply the tools to an improvement project within their operation. The attendants will be presented with the concepts and techniques allowing to practically apply the tools by using simple exercises and modules.

This is a 5-day programme run over 12 weeks. All participants are required to deliver a Lean improvement project within their business. On successful completion of the course, candidates are awarded a Level 5 credit on the National Framework of Qualifications.

 

Course outline:
Task 1: Lean Thinking

Task 2: Project Charter

Task 3: Kaizen

Task 4: 8-step process improvement

Task 5: Value Stream Mapping

Task 6: Workplace Organisation (5s)

Task 7: Kanban

Task 8: Quick Changeover (SMED)

Task 9: Standard Work

Task 10: Asset Care (TPM)

Times: 9am till 5pm

For more information
please contact: ETAC Limited
PDC Centre,
Docklands Innovation Park,
128-130 East Wall Road,
Dublin 3
01 6856535

Should I begin my lean programme with 5s?

We are asked this type of question by many companies.

The idea of a clean and tidy workplace is very appealing and seems an ideal way to begin the lean programme.

Done poorly, and there is little distinction between the 5s initiative and a good spring clean.

Done well, this can involve many people and make an instant impact.

The essence of 5s is to:

Sort – decide what is required and remove everything else. This can be an enjoyable and empowering experience for the team.

Set in order – ensure that what is required has a designated and suitable storage area. Again, this can give the team a tremendous feeling of taking control of their area.

Shine – regular schedules are defined to clean and maintain all that is required – machinery, tools, work areas & materials. Good schedules assist a TPM (Total Preventative Maintenance) programme and SMED (Single Minute Exchange of Die or Quick Changeover).

Standardise – Habits are not formed until a process has been performed many times. Standardising and optimising the new processes takes time. There can be reluctance to move away from old ways which have ‘worked’ for years. Documenting and scheduling the new ways takes time. Setting visual controls takes time and will not be done in one event.

Sustain  – Sustaining 5s in a process requires regular review. How often are schedules checked?. How often are frequencies, limits and quantities re-calculated? How often are visual controls updated?  How often is the system audited and how are results measured and communicated?

Our view is that like any of the lean initiatives, 5s is one of many tools. The lean programme needs to start with clear objectives, a clear definition of value and good understanding of the business processes. In any improvement initiative, we are looking for some measure of success. If 5s clearly impacts our measure of success, then it may be an exercise worth doing early on.

However, if in defining our value stream we realise that our process is unbalanced, carries too much inventory or has poor flow, we may wish to focus on the process first and then apply 5s to the re-designed process.

Some teams decide on 5s as an improvement project. However, the business case and project goals can be very subjective. Ultimately, after the initial enthusiasm, the team can lose motivation as there is no clear measure of where they are going.

What is your experience with 5s? Would you recommend starting a lean programme with 5s? What has and hasn’t worked in your organisation? What are the key challenges and issues?